R T Dalgliesh Fine Art

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  • Northern Lights- 437

Northern Lights- 437

180.00
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Northern Lights- 437

180.00

This little piece measures 12”x12” and looks great hanging next to its buddy. In fact they were painted to hang together. But they are not so codependent they couldn’t be separated. Today only you can buy both of these for the price of two.

PART ONE: I will never forget the summer of 67. But this story starts in 29. I was somewhere in the woods of BC and was a greenhorn when it came to logging. The business was a new one for our area. Most of the lumber back then was being used as ship masts. It was a dangerous job, and I saw more than one topper fall to his death by a bad break. By and by many of my fellows left the area, but I stayed on. I had gone from a spindly youth to a barrel-chested mountain man. I had found love, started a family, built a home and was quite wealthy by the standards of anyone in the 1850's. But by the early sixties, there was a gold rush in the Cariboo Region which demanded more roads and more timber, for housing, cooking, and the growing population. To stay competitive logging companies worked long hours, and in unsafe conditions. I had long since put in my time as a topper and had worked my way up to ground leader. But that winter day Charles had buried his ax deep in his leg when it skipped off a knot. That brought Albert down from the top of the trees and sent me up. The sawdust swirled about my head like a crown, and the air felt crisp and cold. For just a moment I closed my eyes just enjoying the sway of the tree in the breeze, a hundred feet above my fellow crewmen. I may have sat there for a breath or two when I felt the shudder and in the next second heard the thunder crack of a tree splitting. From the ground, they said it looked as though the tree had decided to throw itself to bits across time and space. From my perspective, it happened like a dream. Pieces of wood flew past my face, and my harness held fast to nothing. The falling felt like floating as the branches whipped furiously at my back and raced skyward. Suddenly the blue sky was replaced by greens and purples dancing in rhythm like lovers. I felt the kiss of my wife and saw the laugh of my children. The northern lights were my blanket, and I slept in silence. But there was still a flicker of light...

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This little piece measures 12”x12” and looks great hanging next to its buddy. In fact they were painted to hang together. But they are not so codependent they couldn’t be separated. Today only you can buy both of these for the price of two.

PART ONE: I will never forget the summer of 67. But this story starts in 29. I was somewhere in the woods of BC and was a greenhorn when it came to logging. The business was a new one for our area. Most of the lumber back then was being used as ship masts. It was a dangerous job, and I saw more than one topper fall to his death by a bad break. By and by many of my fellows left the area, but I stayed on. I had gone from a spindly youth to a barrel-chested mountain man. I had found love, started a family, built a home and was quite wealthy by the standards of anyone in the 1850's. But by the early sixties, there was a gold rush in the Cariboo Region which demanded more roads and more timber, for housing, cooking, and the growing population. To stay competitive logging companies worked long hours, and in unsafe conditions. I had long since put in my time as a topper and had worked my way up to ground leader. But that winter day Charles had buried his ax deep in his leg when it skipped off a knot. That brought Albert down from the top of the trees and sent me up. The sawdust swirled about my head like a crown, and the air felt crisp and cold. For just a moment I closed my eyes just enjoying the sway of the tree in the breeze, a hundred feet above my fellow crewmen. I may have sat there for a breath or two when I felt the shudder and in the next second heard the thunder crack of a tree splitting. From the ground, they said it looked as though the tree had decided to throw itself to bits across time and space. From my perspective, it happened like a dream. Pieces of wood flew past my face, and my harness held fast to nothing. The falling felt like floating as the branches whipped furiously at my back and raced skyward. Suddenly the blue sky was replaced by greens and purples dancing in rhythm like lovers. I felt the kiss of my wife and saw the laugh of my children. The northern lights were my blanket, and I slept in silence. But there was still a flicker of light...